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Museum day 2, postlude

My legs hurt. I hope I lose some weight/fat on this tourism exercise plan. Walking Bloomington for exercise: boring and dangerous in recent heat. Walking new cities and museums: fun, until one's legs fall off.

Posting from the eee now, so in theory I could have image links, but we'll see.
...post writing interrupted so I could read my webcomics. Being 5 hours ahead of the US means they don't reliably update until the evening, vs. the morning. My routine is all off.

Into the museum! They have some special but free exhibit on money, so I thought to check that, especially as it was right there when I wandered up some stairs. Some of it is stuff I knew, but it was nice seeing coins and shells and more details. I don't think I knew that early China used cowry shell money; the character from treasure even comes from it. China, Africans, Native Americans...


The root of all evil...

Julius Caesar was the first Roman citizen to be put (by himself) on a coin in his lifetime. Soon followed by Brutus, then Augustus.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886667578/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886667948/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886065305/

Clay tablets could be a lot smaller than I imagined.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886669244/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886067339/

China and cowry
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886669588/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886669946/

Hacksilver, I think
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886067963/
knife and other funny shape 'coins'
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886671292/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886068725/

no reason not to carve weights in nice shapes. (Well, actually, replicability might be a reason.)
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886069119/

how to quickly count money: counting boards. Pour coins on, some fall in holes, sweep off the rest
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886676194/
a few millennia later, an early cash register
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886676696/

zero-rupee bills, to shame corrupt officials with
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886677110/

"piggy banks" of the world
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886076547/

The Glory that was Greece...

Next, Greece and Rome! Life in. Starting with a live fountain.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886077519/
Then good luck rings. If you squint or magnify, you can see they're just a phallus emblem.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886078337/
Magical nails and a leg
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886078805/
Foot bottles
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886080193/
How Athens chose jurors. Might be illegible
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886683248/
For Fanw: Greek medical tools
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886683538/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886081295/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886081617/

Live people got those classic red-and-black vases. Dead ones got white-ground oil flasks
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886684680/

Bronze water pipes. Look pretty 1900 to my untrained eye.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886686112/

Feminist ancients are dead ancients

But really, Greeks and Romans are old hat. Etruscans are where it's at! Women were better off there, thus the title. As for the art... sometimes it's pretty Greek, or a bit off, other times it's really different. Ditto for the non-Roman Italians, the "cutting edge" of Mediterranean archaeology according to a placard. All were in the same room.

A rich Etruscan woman's sarcophagus
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886083857/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886686944/
Canosan busts
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886084987/
Rather different for Italy
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886085743/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886086063/
An Etruscan chair. I swear I've seen similar shape from very fashionable modern designers.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886689726/
Cypriot busts
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886088029/
Etruscan statues
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886691118/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886691660/
Etruscan jewelry. Looked weird up close
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886692016/
Etruscan bowl. Odd compared to red-and-black art, though similar in style to Roman mosaics
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886089739/

Classics
Yesterday I saw the Rosetta stone, woo. Today I hunted down the Elgin marbles. I didn't seem to be in a mood to appreciate them, though, apart from being impressed by how much space they took -- and they're about half of the surviving half. Some things look nice as austere white marble, but I think bas-relief would be greatly improved by the original paint. Speaking of which, a sample of the colors:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886091093/

Pre-classical Greece

"Greece" to us starts around 500 BC. There was life before that, though mysterious non-literate life. (Not pre-literate; they'd had literacy, or still did but didn't leave records.) The art of these Geometric and Orientalizing periods is a bit different. 1000 BC and later.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886091357/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886091669/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886091947/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886695024/
The last two make me think of some medieval portrayals of animals. Dark Ages draw alike?

Jumping somewhere else: more white-ground tomb flasks, but more painted:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886092587/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886092909/
traces of color
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886093305/

Nice photo of me, not so much of the giant Assyrian statuary. Bit of a scale problem, really
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886696910/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886697398/

Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse by I forget who. Mexican?
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886094913/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886095315/

A camera-shaped coffin by the Ga people of Ghana
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindstalk/4886095905/



At 4:50 I switched modes, to something my father used to say: try to eyeball the whole museum at high speed, and pick stuff to come back to later. Note I'd already seen much of Far and Near East Asia. Lykia, Americas, half of the African room, part of Europe... and I ran out of time, galleries were closing at 5:30. That's how big the place is. Though it's not helped by lots of the lower rooms not actually connecting, so you have to backtrack.

Texted RPG.net:Proteus about meeting in a pub, walked to Holborn Tube, and found I'd switched off my phone by accident -- that or it's really getting sick -- and, guess what, wouldn't boot. Again. I thought that backup didn't have experimental applications, but I dunno. Tonight I've gone through by hand, making sure I'm only getting approved apps, and testing re-boot ability, making backups of the list as I go. That SD card: totally worth it.

The pub was interesting. I'm not going to try to be interesting about it, but I had pork belly, and bacon and something mash (potatoes), and sauteed leeks, and it was good. Oh! But the lemonade was sprite or tonic water with lemon in it. Not... what I was expecting.

As mentioned in previous post comments, there's not many homeless people around. I haven't seen any, but Proteus says they're out there. Nothing like Reagan's America, I guess.

Comments

( 3 comments — Leave a comment )
lyceum_arabica
Aug. 13th, 2010 02:11 pm (UTC)
(grins) man, I envy you the british museum. I got to go the summer after I took high school western civ.... spent the day running around with my notebook from class, checking off the things we'd learned about as I saw them :-)
apokalypsetest
Aug. 13th, 2010 04:35 pm (UTC)
I ennvy you the whole trip. However - say farewell to lemonade as you know it - it basically does not exist in Europe.
mindstalk
Aug. 13th, 2010 10:43 pm (UTC)
My hosts said "fresh lemonade" or some other term might be more like American.
( 3 comments — Leave a comment )

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