?

Log in

Previous Entry | Next Entry

Low-tech and geography links

go slow, save energy
http://www.lowtechmagazine.com/2008/09/speed-energy.html
Japan low speed limit, and you lose your license for violating.
lightweight K-cars that are taxed much less

long history of aerial ropeways, with 1644 engraving
http://www.lowtechmagazine.com/2011/01/aerial-ropeways-automatic-cargo-transport.html

men and going to the doctor
http://scarygoround.com/sgr/ar.php?date=20040205

Chad has one psychiatrist
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-24037696

antique maps of Africa
http://geographer-at-large.blogspot.com/2011/04/rediscovering-african-geographies.html

China cartogram with reference inset
http://geographer-at-large.blogspot.com/2011/10/map-of-week-10-17-2011-gridded.html
http://xiaoji-chen.com/blog/2011/population-power-chart-of-chinese-provinces/
Which prompted me to learn that Tibet's population is a whopping 3 million people. (Well, the province anyway; some claim 6 million Tibetans over all, elsewhere.) Xinjiang, the giant province to the north, has 25 million. Qinghai and Ningxia to the north east have about 6 million each. Most of China's population really is in the eastern half or even third, where the rain and greenstuff are. Also puts "Free Tibet" in a new perspective for me. Bhutan is under 800,000! OTOH, Nepal is 27 million. Its capital Kathmandu has 700,000, comparable to most of Bhutan.

US population density map with spikes
http://geographer-at-large.blogspot.com/2011/12/map-of-week-12-12-2011us-population.html
stereotype maps
http://geographer-at-large.blogspot.com/2012/03/map-of-week-3-12-2012the-world.html

I like my physical globe, but Google Earth does make a nice virtual one. Especially after I found the nighttime lights layer: Gallery/NASA/Earth City Lights.


new solar cooker
http://www.treehugger.com/sustainable-product-design/gosun-stove-reinvents-solar-cooking.html
says Chinese cooking is rooted in fuel scarcity and need to cook
through quickly

***

flipped classroom
http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2013/09/the-post-lecture-classroom-how-will-students-fare/279663/

Feynman lectures on web
http://www.feynmanlectures.caltech.edu/I_toc.html

Fargo to be taller than DC
http://www.slate.com/blogs/moneybox/2013/09/13/dakotah_place_fargo_s_going_to_have_a_new_tallest_building.html

The US used to have postal banking
US postal banking
http://www.psmag.com/business-economics/us-postal-service-saturday-delivery-postal-banking-52778/

See the comment count unavailable DW comments at http://mindstalk.dreamwidth.org/374046.html#comments

Comments

( 1 comment — Leave a comment )
dorchadas
Oct. 7th, 2013 11:22 pm (UTC)
K-cars are great because most Japanese roads that aren't major traffic routes are quite narrow. In the town my wife and I lived in, many of the streets were barely wide enough for two non-K cars to pass each other, and the smaller ones required one of them to pull aside to let the other one pass. At least, as far to the side as they could pull, since the roadsides all had drainage ditches next to them. There's a lot of times we would have much rather had a K-car, but it would have been a waste to get rid of our car, since it worked fine.
( 1 comment — Leave a comment )

Profile

Phoenix
mindstalk
Damien Sullivan
Website

Latest Month

July 2017
S M T W T F S
      1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031     

Tags

Page Summary

Powered by LiveJournal.com
Designed by Lilia Ahner