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Coates on the Confederacy and their flag

http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2015/06/what-this-cruel-war-was-over/396482/

'quotes' for Coates himself, "quotes" for the people he quotes in turn.

***

'Black slavery as the basis of white equality was a frequent theme for slaveholders.'

"I would spread the blessings of slavery, like the religion of our Divine Master, to the uttermost ends of the earth, and rebellious and wicked as the Yankees have been, I would even extend it to them."

'Fighting for slavery presented problems abroad, and so Confederate diplomats came up with the notion of emphasizing “states rights” over “slavery”—the first manifestation of what would later become a plank in the foundation of Lost Cause mythology.

The first people to question that mythology were themselves Confederates, distraught to find their motives downplayed or treated as embarassments.'

"Our doctrine is this: WE ARE FIGHTING FOR INDEPENDENCE THAT OUR GREAT AND NECESSARY DOMESTIC INSTITUTION OF SLAVERY SHALL BE PRESERVED, and for the preservation of other institutions of which slavery is the groundwork."

'Even after the war, as the Lost Cause rose, many veterans remained clear about why they had rallied to the Confederate flag. “I’ve never heard of any other cause than slavery,” wrote Confederate commander John S. Mosby. The progeny of the Confederacy repeatedly invoked slavery as the war’s cause.'

'Even after the war, as the Lost Cause rose, many veterans remained clear about why they had rallied to the Confederate flag. “I’ve never heard of any other cause than slavery,” wrote Confederate commander John S. Mosby.'

"The kindliest relation that ever existed between the two races in this country, or that ever will, was the ante-bellum relation of master and slave—a relation of confidence and responsibility on the part of the master and of dependence and fidelity on the part of the slave." -- _The Confederate Veteran_

'In praising the Klan’s terrorism, Confederate veterans and their descendants displayed a remarkable consistency. White domination was the point. Slavery failed. Domination prevailed nonetheless. This was the basic argument of Florida Democratic Senator Duncan Fletcher. “The Cause Was Not Entirely Lost,” he argued in a 1931 speech before the United Daughters of the Confederacy: "The South fought to preserve race integrity. Did we lose that? We fought to maintain free white dominion. Did we lose that?"'

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( 1 comment — Leave a comment )
come_to_think
Jun. 23rd, 2015 02:04 pm (UTC)
From Lincoln's second inaugural address: "One-eighth of the whole population were colored slaves, not distributed generally over the Union, but localized in the southern part of it. These slaves constituted a peculiar and powerful interest. All knew that this interest was somehow the cause of the war...."

I have always admired that word "somehow". It acknowledges that the relation between slavery & rebellion was complicated & open to dispute in matters of detail, but insists on the obvious connection.

"States rights" was still a living euphemism in my childhood (1940s). Everybody knew what it stood for. I heard tell of a southern gentleman who had twin sons and named them States & Rights.
( 1 comment — Leave a comment )

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