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A lesson in bacteria

Cook pasta. Leave the pasta in its water in case you want to make soup, scooping out pasta as needed for other dishes. Leave pasta in its water in the pot on the stove (physically, but gas off), figuring it can't go bad in a day, right? Discover 18 hours later that no, it does have an off smell already.

This happened years ago with a rice and lentil thing, actually: left it moist on the stove, it smelled bad a day later. In both cases, it's a gas stove with a vigorous pilot light, so there actually is some heat input even when 'off'. Also in both cases, the food was warm, whether from the pilot light or from vigorous biological activity or both. I suppose I could experiment, with the pot moved somewhere else. (And not the top of the fridge.)

See the comment count unavailable DW comments at http://mindstalk.dreamwidth.org/437846.html#comments

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( 2 comments — Leave a comment )
thomasyan
Feb. 1st, 2016 03:31 am (UTC)
Was it kept covered? Was it in the summer or winter?

KY's training from Taiwan is that if you cook something covered and do not uncover it, but let it reach room temperature, it should last about a day, or at least overnight, especially in winter. This is a way to conserve fridge space.

Edited at 2016-02-01 03:32 am (UTC)
mindstalk
Feb. 1st, 2016 05:12 am (UTC)
Covered, and last night, so winter in a Boston apartment.

The old rice thing was probably covered; can't be sure of the date.

Edit: might be worth noting that I usually cook whole wheat pasta or brown rice, so they're extra nutritious for humans and germs a like.

WHEAT GERM FOR THE GERM GOD.

Edited at 2016-02-02 03:03 am (UTC)
( 2 comments — Leave a comment )

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