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Legal puzzle

A homicide has been committed. Three people confess to the murder; assume you're confident this was not coerced, at least by the state. Hard evidence of some sort indicates that only one of them could have actually performed the murder. All three must logically be guilty of murder or perjury, or maybe of intended/attempted murder in some tragicomedy of errors (i.e. three try but only one succeeds), but you don't know which.

I don't know how the law would cope with this. But morally, should you:

a) set them all free, because you can't pin a precise crime on any of them
b) send them up for perjury (assuming that's the lesser punishment), since you know all are guilty of at least that
c) send them up for murder, since they're all confessing to it, even though you know they didn't all do it.
d) send them up for attempted murder, since they're all confessing to murder, and it might be reasonable to assume they all wanted to kill the victim even if they didn't.

See the comment count unavailable DW comments at http://mindstalk.dreamwidth.org/332295.html#comments

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( 2 comments — Leave a comment )
notthebuddha
Aug. 26th, 2012 10:22 pm (UTC)
Everyone gets a felony jacket for perjury and does time in minimum security for that, plus lifetime deferred adjudication on assault, attempted murder, murder, and conspiracy.
bemused_leftist
Aug. 26th, 2012 11:10 pm (UTC)
b) - But make it suspected perjury, since the actual murderer's confession would be true (unless you want to find minor errors).

This puts them in jail while you look for more evidence. If you don't find any, put them in the same cell and evesdrop.
( 2 comments — Leave a comment )

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