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D&D gold cheaper than silver

An ancient Greek trireme (crew 200 plus some marines, so closest to an Expert Set Large Galley though meant for war) cost 6000-12,000 drachmae to build, and 6000 drachmae a month to pay crew. A drachma was 4.3 grams of silver and a good day's wage, so sort of like a silver piece except 1/10th the weight and maybe more valuable.

(Old D&D coins were 1/10th of a pound, or 45 grams. 3e went to 1/50th, or 9 grams. US quarters and nickels are about 5 grams.)

3e galleys cost 30,000 GP, plus 8,000 for a ram and castles. I'm not sure if ancient galleys had castles but they sure had rams. Ignoring the 8,000, and using 10,000 drachmae for a trireme for a round number, the D&D 3e galley takes 3x as many coins, which weigh twice as much, and are gold instead of silver. So 3e gold is 1/6 the value of Attic silver.

Older editions were even worse, but I don't know how many GP their galleys cost. Labyrinth Lord, which is a Basic/Expert clone, says 32,000 GP for a large galley with 180 rowers, and uses the 1/10 lb coins, so LL gold is 1/30th the value of Attic silver.

Granted the Expert set said of itself "like the Renaissance without printing press or gunpowder" and the Renaissance had seen a fair bit of inflation (I'm guessing new European mines in the 1300s, from price lists I've seen) and was about to see a lot more (American mines), but still...

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